• German Pinscher

German Pinscher

The perfect breed for the North American lifestyle

German Pinscher

The Standard Pinscher was officially recognized in Germany in 1879 and has been protected and promoted since 1894 by the German Pinscher-Schnauzer Club. During the years around the turn of the century, both smooth (pinscher) and coarse-haired (schnauzer) pups appeared in the same litters. At that time, the Pinscher colors were quite varied. The club initiated the policy of requiring proof of three generations of pure smooth coats for registration. This quickly helped set type and made them a distinct breed from the Schnauzer.

EmpowerThe Doberman and Miniature Pinscher became known worldwide. The Standard Pinscher, now called the ‘German Pinscher', however, fell into obscurity, especially with two world wars in the last century descimating most of Europe where it was primarily found. There were only 10 litters registered in Germany in 1985. Despite the small numbers, interest has been growing to preserve this fine breed. Being the ideal size, this breed is especially perfect for the North American lifestyle and yard size.

The Breed came close to extinction following both World Wars. Only one litter was whelped in West Germany in 1949. No litters were subsequently born until 9 years later. Werner Jung saved the breed in West Germany in 1958 with his dedicated breeding program.

Appearance

The German Pinscher is medium sized, short coated, muscular and powerful, yet elegant in appearance. Ears are traditionally cropped (but can be left natural) to a moderate length, much like a pet cut on a Doberman Pinscher. The tail is docked short when the pup is just a day or two old. Acceptable colors are red, black & tan, blue & tan and fawn. An adult German Pinscher weighs 22 - 40 lbs and measures 15 - 19 inches at the shoulder. They are clean, alert and adaptable to new situations, and are eager to please their 'pack leader'.

Character

The German Pinscher wants very much to be part of the family and loves to join in family activities. They do not thrive as outside dogs. They prefer to be with their people. German Pinschers are wonderful companions because of their devotion and love for the family.

The German Pinscher loves to play and be by your side. A fenced yard is a great place to burn off excess energy. This breed can do very well in canine sports (such as flyball) or agility, as well as excelling in obedience.

American breeders state that the dogs naturally maintain direct eye contact when playing and are incredibly quick and fast, which means they have retained their capabilities as ratters as well. They do maintain their playfulness well into adult years.

Watch Dogs

The German Pinscher makes an excellent guard dog. They will accept regular visitors but they are wary of strangers. They are very loyal and they will fight to the end if necessary to protect their home and family.

With Children

The Standard Pinscher was officially recognized in Germany in 1879 and has been protected and promoted since 1894 by the German Pinscher-Schnauzer Club. During the years around the turn of the century, both smooth (pinscher) and coarse-haired (schnauzer) pups appeared in the same litters. At that time, the Pinscher colors were quite varied. The club initiated the policy of requiring proof of three generations of pure smooth coats for registration. This quickly helped set type and made them a distinct breed from the Schnauzer.

The Doberman and Miniature Pinscher became known worldwide. The Standard Pinscher, now called the ‘German Pinscher', however, fell into obscurity, especially with two world wars in the last century descimating most of Europe where it was primarily found. There were only 10 litters registered in Germany in 1985. Despite the small numbers, interest has been growing to preserve this fine breed. Being the ideal size, this breed is especially perfect for the North American lifestyle and yard size.

EmpowerThe Breed came close to extinction following both World Wars. Only one litter was whelped in West Germany in 1949. No litters were subsequently born until 9 years later. Werner Jung saved the breed in West Germany in 1958 with his dedicated breeding program.

Contact Us

You have questions? That's why we're here.

About the Breeder

Donna Smith is a professional dog breeder with over 30 years experience and specializing in the two magnificent breeds the German Pinscher & Doberman Pinscher.

Breed Inquiries

If you're interested in a current litter email or call us by phone. To reserve a puppy for a future litter please fill our our "Breed Inquiries" form and we'll respond promptly.

Contact Details

  • PHONE 780.986.6877
  • EMAIL hello@tri-pinscher.com
  • FACEBOOK@tri-pinscher
  • TWITTER@tri-pinscher

Location Info

  • 30 mins sourth of Edmonton
  • Leduc Country
  • Alberta, Canada
  • Please call for directions